Jan 27, 2023  
2022-2023 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2022-2023 Undergraduate Catalog

The George L. Argyros School of Business and Economics


Henrik Cronqvist, Ph.D., Dean
Candace Ybarra, Ph.D., Associate Dean for Academic Programs
Abel Winn, Ph.D., Associate Dean for Research and Administration

Professors: Bowen, Campbell, Camera, Cronqvist, Doti, Giannantonio, Gillespie, Hanson, Iannaccone, James, Jollineau, Kaplan, Kathuria, Kimbrough, Kovenock, Kraft, Moses, Pfeiffer, Porter, Rassenti, Rubin, Sfeir, Smith, Turk, Warachka, Weidenmier, Wilson;
Distinguished Professor: Romans;
Visiting Reseach Professors: Pouget, Schniter;
Associate Professors: Balli, Broughton, Burnham, Danaher, Dehning, DeSantis, Murray, Nyer, Selove, Shields, Shukla, Walker, Winn, Ybarra;
Clinical Associate Professors: Adler, Browne, Crockett, Hampton, Lawandy, Myhr, Poddar, Sinha;
Assistant Professors: Bana, Barardehi, Bentley, Benzell, Bird, Chu, Doosti, Hersh, Huseman, Leather, Li, Liu, Matranga, Shin, Wilhelm, Zia;
Clinical Assistant Professors: Ataman, Berkovitz, Houldsworth, Jolly, Leone, Lowe, Lu, Mason, Nistor, Toplansky, Toukan, Vracheva, Willis;
Instructional Assistant Professor: Rojo Arjona;
Instructors: Anderson, Bourgeois, Clark, Lloyd, Tauzin;
Presidential Fellow: Gjerstad.

The George L. Argyros School of Business and Economics is dedicated to preparing its graduates for roles as innovators, leaders and value creators in the twenty-first century. The Argyros School seeks to accomplish this through academic programs blending the best of business theory with exposure to the best of business practice. As globalization and technological advancement lead to increasing complexity in business affairs, the Argyros School strives to meet the educational needs of the next generation of business leaders.

In addition to offering rigorous degree programs, the Argyros School operates centers that address the driving forces of the market: economic research, entrepreneurship, globalization and finance. In our centers, faculty from various functional disciplines work together to address interdisciplinary themes in teaching, research and outreach. The centers provide a means to take the George L. Argyros School of Business and Economics to the business world and to the larger community and conversely to bring the outside business world and community to the school. Additional information about our centers is found by clicking the title links below.

Centers

A. Gary Anderson Center for Economic Research

C. Larry Hoag Center for Real Estate and Finance

Ralph W. Leatherby Center for Entrepreneurship and Business Ethics

Walter Schmid Center for International Business

Admission Requirements

Admission to the Argyros School of Business and Economics is determined separately from admission to the University. Currently enrolled Chapman students wishing to change majors to a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Bachelor of Science in Accounting, Bachelor of Arts in Economics or add a business or economics minor, must submit an application to the Argyros School of Business and Economics assistant dean for undergraduate programs.

The application to pursue a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration or a Bachelor of Science in Accounting will not be approved until the student has completed MATH 109 , ECON 200 , ECON 201  and ACTG 210  with a grade point average of 2.700 or higher. Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Economics requires completion of ECON 200 , ECON 201  and MATH 109  or MATH 110  with a grade point average of 2.700 or higher. Students may elect to repeat any of these courses in an attempt to earn a higher grade, but only the grades from the first two attempts of each of these four courses (three for the Economics degree) will be used to determine the student’s eligibility to become an Argyros School of Business and Economics Major.

Admitted students pursuing a BS in Business Administration or a BS in Accounting: 

  • must attain at least a 2.700 grade point average in MATH 109 , ECON 200 , ECON 201  and ACTG 210  before enrolling in upper-division courses.
  • maintain at least a 2.000 overall grade point average in the major.
  • may elect to repeat any of these courses in an attempt to earn a higher grade. But only the letter grades from the first two attempts of each of these four courses will be used to determine the student’s eligibility to enroll in upper-division courses. Students not able to achieve a 2.7 after retaking these four courses a maximum of two times each will not be eligible to continue to pursue a BS in Business Administration or Accounting. 
  • If a course is repeated at Chapman University, only the higher grade will be used to compute the grade point average. However, consistent with University policy, if the course is repeated at another institution, the grade earned at Chapman will continue to be included in the student’s grade point average computation.
  • complete all courses in the major for a letter grade and receive at least a “C-” grade.

Admitted students pursuing a BA in Economics:

  • must attain at least a 2.700 grade point average in ECON 200 , ECON 201  and MATH 109  or MATH 110  before enrolling in upper-division courses.
  • maintain at least a 2.000 overall grade point average in the major.
  • may elect to repeat any of these courses in an attempt to earn a higher grade. But only the letter grades from the first two attempts of each of these four courses will be used to determine the student’s eligibility to enroll in upper-division courses. Students not able to achieve a 2.7 after retaking these three courses a maximum of two times each will not be eligible to continue to pursue a BA in Economics. 
  • If a course is repeated at Chapman University, only the higher grade will be used to compute the grade point average. However, consistent with University policy, if the course is repeated at another institution, the grade earned at Chapman will continue to be included in the student’s grade point average computation.
  • complete all courses in the major for a letter grade and receive at least a “C-” grade.

Admitted students pursuing a Business Administration minor:

  • must attain at least a 2.500 grade point average in MATH 109 , ECON 200 , ECON 201  and ACTG 210  before enrolling in upper-division courses.
  • maintain at least a 2.000 overall grade point average in the minor.
  • may elect to repeat any of these courses in an attempt to earn a higher grade. But only the letter grades from the first two attempts of each of these four courses will be used to determine the student’s eligibility to enroll in upper-division courses. Students not able to achieve a 2.5 after retaking these four courses a maximum of two times each will not be eligible to get a minor in Business Administration.  
  • If a course is repeated at Chapman University, only the higher grade will be used to compute the grade point average. However, consistent with University policy, if the course is repeated at another institution, the grade earned at Chapman will continue to be included in the student’s grade point average computation.
  • complete all courses in the minor for a letter grade and receive at least a “C-” grade.

Admitted students pursuing an Economics minor:  

  • must attain at least a 2.500 grade point average in ECON 200 , ECON 201  and MATH 109  or MATH 110  before enrolling in upper-division courses.
  • maintain at least a 2.000 overall grade point average in the minor.
  • may elect to repeat any of these courses in an attempt to earn a higher grade. But only the letter grades from the first two attempts of each of these four courses will be used to determine the student’s eligibility to enroll in upper-division courses. Students not able to achieve a 2.5 after retaking these three courses a maximum of two times each will not be eligible to get a minor in Business Administration.
  • If a course is repeated at Chapman University, only the higher grade will be used to compute the grade point average. However, consistent with University policy, if the course is repeated at another institution, the grade earned at Chapman will continue to be included in the student’s grade point average computation.
  • complete all courses in the minor for a letter grade and receive at least a “C-” grade.

Please note: The Minors in Analytics, Entrepreneurship and Humanomics do not require an application or minimum grade point average for admission. 

Argyros School of Business and Economics Degree Requirements

  • All students must receive at least a “C-” grade in each lower-division and upper-division required course and any courses counted towards an emphasis.
  • All courses applied to a major or minor must be taken for a letter grade.
  • Courses taken for Pass/No Pass credit in other Chapman colleges or schools cannot be applied to an Argyros School major or minor.
  • Transfer credits for upper-division Argyros School courses are only accepted from AACSB accredited institutions.
  • Transfer courses taken Pass/No Pass will not be accepted for any Argyros School major or minor.

Course enrollment Policies

  • All upper-division Argyros School courses other than MKTG 305  will be restricted to Argyros School majors/minors only, with the exception of Argyros School courses required for the Bachelor of Arts in Strategic and Corporate Communications, the Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems, the Minor in Leadership Studies, the Minor in Game Development Programming and the Bachelor of Arts In Integrated Educational Studies, community emphasis.
  • All prerequisites will be strictly enforced.
  • Non-Argyros School students will not be allowed to enroll in restricted courses unless they receive assistant dean or associate dean approval.

Departmental Honors
Graduating students will be designated “Argyros Scholars” if they have at least 54 graded Chapman credits and their Argyros School GPA is in the top 10 percent of all Argyros School students graduating in the same commencement.

Minors in Argyros School of Business and Economics
Students can earn a Minor in Analytics, Business Administration, Economics, Entrepreneurship or Humanomics. Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Accounting degree or the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree are not eligible to earn the Minor in Entrepreneurship.

Graduate Programs
Argyros School of Business and Economic offers a number of graduate programs. For detailed information and the complete list of degrees and requirements, please see the Graduate catalog.

Degrees

Bachelor of Arts

Bachelor of Science

Minor

Certificate Program

Integrated Program

Courses

Accounting

  •  

    ACTG 210 - Introduction to Financial Accounting


    Prerequisite, MATH 109 , or MATH 110 , or equivalent. An introduction to the financial accounting process, the concepts of asset/liability valuation and income measurement, and the preparation and interpretation of financial statements. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ACTG 211 - Introduction to Managerial Accounting


    Prerequisite, ACTG 210 . An introduction to the use of accounting information in the planning, control and decision-making functions of management. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ACTG 312 - Financial Reporting and Statement Analysis


    (Same as FIN 312 .) Prerequisite, ACTG 211 . Analysis of accounting and tax information for business decisions. Financial statements analysis. Pro forma financial statements. Cash flow analysis. Credit evaluation. Additional financial and tax reporting issues including reporting in multinational environments. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ACTG 320 - Cost Accounting I


    Prerequisite, ACTG 211 . Theory of cost accounting and cost control for manufacturing and service type entities. Topics include job order and process costing, accounting for by-products and joint costs and development of a master budget. Letter grade. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ACTG 321 - Cost Accounting II


    Prerequisite, ACTG 320 . Theory of cost accounting and cost control relating to materials, labor, and overhead; variance analysis; management utilization of cost information in overall evaluation of business performance. Activity-based accounting, break-even and variable costing techniques, and accounting for non-routine business decisions. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ACTG 330 - Intermediate Financial Accounting I


    Prerequisite, ACTG 210 . A comprehensive examination of financial accounting and reporting. Topics include the conceptual framework, financial accounting systems, preparation and presentation of financial statements, revenue recognition, cash and receivables, inventory, plant assets and intangibles. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ACTG 331 - Intermediate Financial Accounting II


    Prerequisites, ACTG 211 , ACTG 330 . A continuation of ACTG 330 . Topics include bonds and other long-term liabilities; leases, pensions and other post-retirement benefits; deferred income taxes; stockholders’ equity; earnings per share; investments in securities of other companies, and a review of the cash flow statement. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ACTG 339 - Accounting Information Systems


    Prerequisite, ACTG 330  or consent of instructor. Accounting information systems and the use of information technology for decision making, including controlling risks within business processes. Emphasis on sources and types of information and the use of analytical tools in solving accounting management problems. Letter grade. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ACTG 440 - Accounting for Investments and Consolidations


    Prerequisite, ACTG 331 , or equivalent. Comprehensive coverage of accounting for investments and complex entities including mergers and acquisitions and consolidated financial statements. Letter grade. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ACTG 441 - Not-For Profit and Government Accounting, and International Accounting


    Prerequisite, ACTG 331  or equivalent. Focus on not-for-profit and government entities, accounting for multinational transactions including foreign currency translation, international accounting standards, partnerships and trusts. Letter grade with Pass/No Pass option. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ACTG 450 - Individual Taxation


    Prerequisite, ACTG 211 . Federal income tax related primarily to individuals. Included are concepts of income, deductions, credits, and capital gains and losses. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ACTG 451 - Taxation of Corporations and Other Entities


    Prerequisite, ACTG 211 . Federal income tax law related to partnerships, corporations, Subchapter S corporations, and an overview of federal estate and gift taxes. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ACTG 460 - Auditing


    Prerequisites, ACTG 330 , ACTG 339 . Auditing theory issues examined are the purpose of auditing, ethics, legal liability, the auditor’s opinion and alternative forms of reporting. The audit practice issues covered include: evidential matter, audit planning and documentation, review of internal control, use of statistical methods, and auditing in the computer environment. Letter grade. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ACTG 461 - Accounting Analytics


    Prerequisites, accounting major, ACTG 339  and ACTG 460  or equivalent. An introduction to how to leverage SQL and statistical analysis to address problems/applications in financial and managerial accounting, auditing, taxation, and accounting information systems. The primary tool used will be R, with optional use of Alteryx. Letter grade. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ACTG 496 - Special Topics in Accounting


    In-depth study of a specific area; content of course determined by student interest and instructor. Course titles and prerequisites may vary. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Some courses may require student lab fees. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits
  •  

    ACTG 499 - Individual Study


    Prerequisite, approval of petition. For students who wish to pursue a special area of study not included in the curriculum. Maximum of 6 credits. (Offered every semester.) 1-3 credits

Business

  •  

    BUS 100 - Introduction to Business


    Not required for business or accounting majors. Business and accounting majors will not receive credit for taking this course. An overview of the American business environment. Topics include forms of organizational structure, techniques of decision-making and control, managing and motivating people, marketing, production, accounting and funds management, globalization, technology and e-commerce. Cannot be used to fulfill major requirements. Letter grade. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    BUS 110 - Accounting and Finance for Non-Majors


    An introduction to accounting information, financial statements and basic financial decision making. Cannot be used to fulfill major requirements. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    BUS 215 - Legal Environment of Business


    Prerequisite, ECON 200 . Introduction to the legal environment as it relates to agencies, partnerships, and corporations. Emphasis on contract law. Brief review of torts and crimes in the context of various business entities. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    BUS 216 - Business Ethics


    Prerequisite, satisfaction of the written inquiry requirement in the general education program. Ethics and its scope in the context of business. The course briefly covers the presuppositions of ethics and how ethics and economics are compatible, the structure of ethics, its various branches, and some of the main ethical theories. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit
  •  

    BUS 229 - Experimental Course


    This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore experimental areas and subjects of special interest. Repeatable if course topic is different. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits
  •  

    BUS 290 - Internship


    Offers students an opportunity to earn credit and learn professional skills “on the job.” A minimum of 40 hours of work for each credit is required. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) ½-6 credits in one position
  •  

    BUS 291 - Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity


    Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1-3 credits
  •  

    BUS 299 - Individual Study


    Prerequisites, freshman, or sophomore standing only and consent of instructor. For students who wish to pursue a special area of study not included in the curriculum. To enroll in individual study and research, students must complete the individual study and research form (available from the Office of the University Registrar) and obtain the signatures of the department chair of the course and course instructor. Students should spend 40 to 50 hours in instruction and research for each credit of individual study. May be repeated for credit. Maximum of 6 credits. (Offered every semester.) 1-6 credits
  •  

    BUS 303 - Israel: Business Innovation and Culture


    Prerequisites, ECON 200 ECON 201 , MGSC 300 . This course is designed to focus on four areas: 1. International Business 2. Entrepreneurship 3. Technology 4. Economic development. Students will study the innovation and technology-creation process and understand how Israel’s unique cultural, political and economic environment enhance that process. the course will be conducted in three phases: • There will be a three-week prep session on the principles of innovation, the economic history of Israel and the role of government and venture capital-backed entrepreneurial business that will be conducted in Orange County. A short test after the three weeks will assess the students’ assimilation of knowledge on these topics. • A 12-day international travel component to visit Israeli companies, universities and venture capital operations will be conducted in June 2019. Students will keep a journal of their observations during the trip. • When the class returns from Israel, there will be a follow-up session and students will write a paper summarizing what they learned in Israel. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.
  •  

    BUS 329 - Experimental Course


    This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore experimental areas and subjects of special interest. Repeatable if course topic is different. Repeatable if course topic is different. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits
  •  

    BUS 475 - Business Policy: An International Perspective


    Prerequisites, senior standing, completion of lower and upper-division core requirements. This course examines the relationships between policy-making, strategy, tactics, and organizational control. Policy formulation and execution are of primary importance. Issues surrounding corporate ethics and social responsibility are investigated. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    BUS 486 - Business Across Cultures


    Prerequisites, ECON 200 , ECON 201 . Students will evaluate how differences in national, corporate, and professional culture can best be orchestrated to maximize firm value. The course will also address the applicability of Western management techniques across cultures. The class will feature a series of classroom lectures and on-line assignments. There is a required 10 day international travel component to visit local and foreign invested businesses in one country located in the Pacific Rim or in South America. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits
  •  

    BUS 490 - Independent Internship


    Prerequisites, completion of lower-division core requirements, junior or senior standing, up-to-date résumé. Internships provide for integration of a student’s academic and/or career interests with productive work experiences. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) ½-6 credits in one position
  •  

    BUS 491 - Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity


    Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1-3 credits
  •  

    BUS 494 - International Business Travel Course


    Prerequisites, TBD. International business travel course; content of course changes every semester. May be repeated once. Fee: TBD. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits
  •  

    BUS 495 - Special Topics in International Business


    In-depth study of an international business topic; content of course changes every semester. Letter grade. Repeatable for credit once if the topic is different. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits
  •  

    BUS 496 - Special Topics in Business


    In-depth study of a specific area; content changes each semester. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits
  •  

    BUS 499 - Individual Study


    Prerequisite, approval of petition. For students who wish to pursue a special area of study not included in the curriculum. Maximum of 6 credits. (Offered every semester.) 1-3 credits

Economics

  •  

    ECON 200 - Principles of Microeconomics


    Prerequisites, MATH 100 MATH 100L  or equivalent. Decision-making with scarce resources, supply and demand concepts, pricing in competitive and non-competitive markets, capital theory, resource pricing, public choice, environmental economics, international trade, and comparative economic systems. Letter grade. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 201 - Principles of Macroeconomics


    Prerequisites, MATH 100 MATH 100L  or equivalent. Theory of national income equilibrium and fluctuations, money and banking, monetary and fiscal policy, international trade, and foreign exchange rates. Letter grade. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 204 - Seminar in Ethics and Economic Thought


    Prerequisite, economics major. Using Socratic dialogue this course engages students in exploring the ethics and economics of creating wealth through exchange. The seminar is devoted to developing the rhetorical effectiveness and analytical precision of students’ ideas in written composition and oral argument. It is strongly recommended that students have completed (or are concurrently enrolled in) at least one of ECON 200  or ECON 201 . Letter grade. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 291 - Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity


    Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1-3 credits
  •  

    ECON 299 - Individual Study


    Prerequisites, freshman, or sophomore standing only and consent of instructor. For students who wish to pursue a special area of study not included in the curriculum. To enroll in individual study and research, students must complete the individual study and research form (available from the Office of the University Registrar) and obtain the signatures of the department chair of the course and course instructor. Students should spend 40 to 50 hours in instruction and research for each credit of individual study. May be repeated for credit. Maximum of 6 credits. (Offered every semester.) 1-6 credits
  •  

    ECON 315 - Economics of Religion


    Prerequisites, MGSC 209 , or MATH 203 , and ECON 350 . This course employs economic theory and social-scientific methods to study religious beliefs, behavior, and institutions. By combining economic concepts and real-world data, this course will address a wide range of questions concerning the content, causes, and consequences of religion. To a lesser extent, the course will also study the social, political, and economic correlates of religion. (Note that the economic study of religion is a social-scientific enterprise. It does not seek to evaluate the truth of religious claims, nor does it promote one religion over another.) (Offered every year.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 329 - Experimental Course


    This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore experimental areas and subjects of special interest. Repeatable if course topic is different. (Offered as needed. 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 350 - Intermediate Microeconomics Theory


    Prerequisites, ECON 200 , ECON 201 , and MATH 109 , or MATH 110 . An intermediate course in microeconomics theory. Theory of demand derived from indifference curves and revealed preference. Supply analysis derived from cost and production functions. Product and resource pricing for both price-seeking and price-taking firms. Other topics covered include externality theory, game theory, and public choice. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 351 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory


    Prerequisites, ECON 200 , ECON 201 , and MATH 109 , or MATH 110 . Aggregate supply and demand curves, IS-LM and algebraic models are used to analyze classical, Keynesian, and modern theories of the economy, and the national and international implications of policy decisions. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 357 - Topics in Humanomics


    (Same as ENG 357 , PHIL 357 .) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Using Socratic dialogue this course engages students in dialogically exploring economics, philosophy, and literature texts to examine two questions at the core of Humanomics: What makes a rich nation rich? What makes a good person good? This course encourages in-depth study of the co-constitutive social texts regarding the exponential economic growth of the last two-hundred years, asking students to consider how knowledge, ethics, and aesthetics shape and reshape basic principles of exchange and the human condition. This course may be repeated for credit if the topic is different. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 373 - Economic History


    (Same as HIST 373 .) Prerequisite, ECON 200 . This class will provide a general overview of important events and periods in the economic history of the U.S. and an analysis of important historical events from an economic viewpoint. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 374 - European Economic History


    (Same as HIST 374 .) Prerequisites, ECON 200 , ECON 201 . This course analyzes the evolution of European economic institutions and the development of industry, commerce, and finance from the fall of the Roman Empire to the Industrial Revolution. It traces the historical path which culminated in European economic hegemony. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 411 - International Economics


    Prerequisites, ECON 200 , ECON 201 . International trade policy, including effects of tariffs, quotas, subsidies, exchange control, and other trade restrictions upon a nation’s economy. Analysis of balance of payments. Causes and methods of correction of disequilibrium in the balance of payments. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 421 - Behavioral Economics and Finance


    Prerequisites, MATH 110 ECON 200,  MATH 203 . This course will introduce you to the fields of behavioral economics and behavioral finance. Behavioral economics is the economic study of human behavior in individual choices, social situations, markets and institutions motivated by the goal to improve the descriptive accuracy and explanatory power of traditional economic analysis. Behavioral finance is the application of insights from behavioral economics and psychology to study individual financial decisions and properties of financial markets and market prices. Students will explore both areas from the perspective of different methodologies (experiments, theory, field studies), focusing on both fundamental concepts and their applications at different levels of social aggregation (from individuals to markets). Some sections of ECON 421 and ECON 521 will be taught together. Letter grade. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 425 - Economics of Non-Market Behavior


    Prerequisite, ECON 350 . Applications of economic theory and methods to “non-market” topics, including crime, discrimination, addiction, marriage, fertility, family life, education, religion, sports, and philanthropy. Special emphasis on the path-breaking work of Gary Becker. (Offered as needed. 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 431 - Health: Economic, Psychological, and Anthropological Perspectives


    Prerequisite, MATH 203  or MGSC 209  or PSY 203 . This course will introduce students to economic, psychological, and anthropological perspectives explaining variation in health, wealth, and wellbeing - both within societies and across societies. Students will explore a variety of health related research questions from three perspectives of quantitative inquiry: the first uses macroeconomics, demography, and cross-cultural comparison (comparing phenomena at levels of aggregate levels of populations, countries, and socioeconomic strata), the second uses behavioral economics (i.e., the study of how psychological, social, cognitive, and emotional factors affect the economic decisions of individuals), and the third uses anthropological studies to understand human-environment health interactions from an evolutionarily informed behavioral ecology perspective. The course will be comprised of lecture and discussion, homework problems, and final presentations in class. Some sections of this course may be taught with ECON 531. Letter grade. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 441 - Economic Development


    Prerequisites, ECON 200 , ECON 201 . Theories of economic growth, interaction of culture and development, and obstacles to development. Geography and its relation to development. Problems of capital formation and technological transfers. Public and private sources of investment. Policies and programs to accelerate growth in underdeveloped areas. Letter grade. (Offered every year.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 448 - Managerial Economics


    Prerequisites, ACTG 210 , ECON 200 , ECON 201 , and MGSC 209 , or MATH 203 . Use an application of economic theory and statistics in the decision-making process. Cases and lectures. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 449 - Industrial Organization


    Prerequisites, ECON 350 , and MATH 109 , or MATH 110 . This course uses applied microeconomic theory to study the relationships between firm conduct, market structure, and industry performance. Topics include monopoly power and imperfect competition, price discrimination, product differentiation, firm entry/exit, advertising, and signaling. The course will introduce the possibility that free markets may not produce the socially optimal set of products. Emphasis will be divided equally between the strategic implications of the models and the policy implications. (Offered every year.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 452 - Econometrics


    Prerequisites, ECON 200 , ECON 201  and MATH 109  or MATH 110 , and MGSC 209  or MATH 203  and business administration, or economics major, or computational science, or economics, or mathematics minor. Mathematical and statistical tools to measure economic phenomena. This will involve mathematical formulation of economic theories and statistical inference relating economic theory to empirical analysis. Letter grade. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 455 - The Path to the Modern Economy


    Prerequisites, ECON 200 ECON 201 . This course analyzes the evolution of the modern economy from various perspectives. It provides an overview for various arguments put forth to explain why the modern economy arose first in Europe and not in other parts of the world, such as China or the Middle East. Letter grade. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 465 - Environmental and Natural Resources Economics


    Prerequisites, ECON 200 , ECON 201 . Theories of environmental and natural resource economics will be examined both for allocative efficiency and for impacts on growth. The theory of public choice and the theory of market failure will be studied. Theory will be applied to renewable and nonrenewable resources and to pollution of air, water, and land. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 471 - Experimental Economics I


    Prerequisites, MATH 110 , ECON 350  and MATH 203 , or MGSC 209 , or consent of instructor. This course is designed to engage students as participants in a variety of laboratory market situations, to evaluate outcomes of the laboratory markets relative to theoretical benchmarks for market performance, and to consider the implications of market performance on society. Please note - students who plan to apply to the MSESD program or are already admitted in the MSESD program will need to register for ECON 571 instead of ECON 471. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits
  •  

    ECON 481 - Auction and Market Design


    (Same as MATH 481 .) Prerequisite, MATH 116  or MATH 210  or MGSC 209  or consent of instructor. This course translates economic theory and analysis into practical solutions to real-world problems. By redesigning both the rules that guide market transactions and the technology that enables trades to take place, this course shows how decentralized systems like auctions can assist organizations and societies to better allocate scarce resources. Topics include digital advertising, matching, spectrum allocation and high-frequency trading to name a few. Letter grade. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits
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    ECON 489 - Seminar In Economic Science


    Prerequisite, ECON 200  or consent of instructor. Students required to pre-read papers presented by various speakers, attend their seminars, ask intelligent questions and summarize the content and importance of the seminar. Please note - students that plan to apply to the MSBCE program or are already admitted in the MSBCE program need to register for ECON 689 instead of 489. Pass/No Pass. This course may be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 2 credits
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    ECON 491 - Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity


    Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1-3 credits
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    ECON 496 - Special Topics in Economics


    Prerequisites, ECON 200 , ECON 201 . Some sections of this course may require different prerequisites or corequisites. In-depth study of a specific area; content of course changes every semester. Some sections of this course may require different Prerequisites or corequisites. Letter grade. Repeatable for credit once if the topic is different. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits
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    ECON 499 - Individual Study


    Prerequisite, approval of petition. For students who wish to pursue a special area of study not included in the curriculum. Maximum 6 credits. (Offered every semester.) 1-3 credits

Entrepreneurship

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    ENTR 300 - Entrepreneurial Finance


    Prerequisites, entrepreneurship minor, BUS 110,  MKTG 305  both with a grade point average of 2.5 or above. Argyros Business School majors may not take this course. Effective new venture management relies on clearly defined financial models and analysis. This course will explore the tools of financial valuation and their role in investment decisions faced by managers, entrepreneurs, and investors. Students will learn the difference between earnings and cash flow, the importance of net working capital, and the determinants of a firm’s cost of capital. Students will explore the sources and drivers of value and how to optimize these forces. The class will build upon the student’s previous financial analysis skills and examine various financial models to better understand investment opportunities as well as timing or staging those investments. Furthermore, financial models will be used to assess the value proposition for an in-house product launch/project. Letter grade. (Offered every year.) 3 credits
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    ENTR 310 - How to Successfully Start a New Business


    Prerequisites for entrepreneurship minor, ENTR 300 , MKTG 305 , entrepreneurship minor. Prerequisites for entrepreneurship emphasis in business administration, FIN 317 , MKTG 304 , entrepreneurship emphasis. The purpose of this course is to explore the many dimensions of new venture creation and growth and to foster innovation and new business formations in independent and corporate settings. The course addresses both a theoretical perspective on venture initiation and the application of writing a comprehensive business plan. Students will be expected to generate ideas, identify problems, analyze and evaluate alternatives, and formulate workable action plans. Student teams will utilize the tools and analytical approaches discussed in class to their venture, through simulations, labs, lectures and class discussions that are designed to familiarize students with the many dimensions of entrepreneurship and new venture initiation. Letter grade. (Offered every year.) 3 credits
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    ENTR 315 - Protecting Ideas and Innovation


    Prerequisite, ENTR 310 . How, and to what extent, do patents and other intellectual property (trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets) really provide a competitive advantage for new product and service companies, and how does IP drive shareholder value? What makes IP assets strategically powerful tools? How does IP impact, and even drive, major corporate decisions including M&A, venture funding and exits, and entry into new markets?  In this course, students will learn to critically analyze and answer these questions, gaining insights they can leverage in their future roles as innovation industry executives, entrepreneurs, strategists, and investors. The course includes topics on: Patents and Innovation Value; Trademarks, Copyrights and Trade Secrets: Students will examine closely the relationship between competitive advantage, value proposition, and intellectual property (particularly patents). Limits and Alternatives to Patents: Students will confront the recent legal trend toward reigning in the power and scope of patents. The course will also examine other legal aspects of entrepreneurship that every entrepreneur should understand, from start-up to IPO, to make good business decisions and drive shareholder value. These issues include (1) restrictive employment agreements and the art of leaving your current employer to start a new business, (2) the different forms of business organizations and ownership structures, (3) securities and funding a venture, (4) entering contracts, (5) product liability, (6) advertising, consumer privacy and data breaches, and (7) human resources issues including hiring and retaining the best staff. Letter grade. (Offered every year.) 3 credits
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    ENTR 335 - Customer Acquisition and Insights


    Prerequisite, ENTR 310 . Entrepreneurs and operators must understand the correct strategies and methods used to acquire customers, particularly in the early stages of a company.  Whether it is through outbound or inbound marketing to acquire customers, upselling products or services by introducing, or retaining customers by providing consistent services, it is crucial for a company to understand consumer behavior. Students will cultivate a way of thinking that will help them navigate the ever-shifting digital landscape. They will learn how to use various traditional and digital marketing techniques, including: content marketing, search, digital and social media advertising, social advocacy and influencer marketing, mobile apps, personalization and digital loyalty programs, conversational marketing, location-based, omni-channel marketing, freemium strategies, and the use of web analytics for tracking customer acquisitions and conversion. The class will also cover metrics such as CAC (Customer Acquisitions) LTV (Long-Term Value), Win/Loss Ratios, cohort analysis, and churn to gain a deeper understanding of their customer acquisition funnel as well as a company’s ability to retain customers. Letter grade. (Offered every year.) 3 credits
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    ENTR 400 - Managing and Scaling-Up Operations for Startups


    Prerequisites, ENTR 310 , MGSC 346 . Once product-market is confirmed, operations management must be effective and efficient for ventures to scale. The aim of operations management is to create the highest level of efficiency possible, considering the many assets available, and limitations inherent to a new operation. The course will examine new ventures that have achieved at least one round of institutional financing or product-market fit, through a variety of functional lenses, including product management, sales and marketing, business development, and engineering and technology. This course is foundational for students pursuing careers in entrepreneurship, consulting, and management. The course will approach the challenge of scaling operations and operations strategy by taking a holistic view of all aspects of a business and will focus on decisions and challenges that many firms face as they try to scale their operations. Letter grade. (Offered every year.) 3 credits
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    ENTR 410 - Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital


    Prerequisite, ENTR 310 . The goal of the course is to understand how entrepreneurs can raise funds and how venture capital partnerships choose, value, structure, fund, and manage their investments. The course will challenge the student to think about the entrepreneur’s journey from the perspective of an investor while educating the student on how the venture capital world operates. A combination of lectures, case studies, and guest speakers with real world experience will be used to maximize the students’ learnings. A solid understanding of accounting and finance is needed for this course as there will be a focus on basic valuation skills and concepts covering the analysis of businesses. The course will require modeling of businesses and investments using excel. Letter grade. (Offered every year.) 3 credits
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    ENTR 415 - Entrepreneurial Failure


    Prerequisites for entrepreneurship minor, ENTR 310 , ENTR 315 , entrepreneurship minor. Prerequisites for entrepreneurship emphasis in business administration, ENTR 310 , ENTR 335 ENTR 400 , entrepreneurship emphasis. Most courses do not teach the process of failing forward. This is an important issue since most entrepreneurial startups fail. Whether it is team sports, martial arts, or trading in the stock market, most approaches begin with one’s ability to defend oneself before going on the offensive. This course will allow students to have a greater understanding on why and how startups fail; what entrepreneurs can do to avoid failure; and if they do fail, how founders can exit companies amicably with various stakeholders and leverage previous relationships to relaunch and reinvent their careers. The end goal of the course is to help students attain a full perspective on entrepreneurship and help overcome the fear of starting a new business on their own. Letter grade. (Offered every year.) 3 credits
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    ENTR 420 - New Technology Ventures


    Prerequisites for entrepreneurship minor, ENTR 310 , ENTR 315 . Prerequisites for entrepreneurship emphasis in business administration, BUS 215 ENTR 310 . Creating a new venture that has technology as a basis for its products or services presents special challenges. On one hand is the “push” of new technology, as evidenced by the plethora of scientific invention and technological innovation. On the other hand is the “pull” of the market as it presents new entrepreneurial opportunities. This course will explore entrepreneurship in technology industries in depth with the hope of penetrating the popular headlines and uncovering the complexities of starting a growing new technology venture. Of course, there is a lot about new technology venturing that is common to all new venture creation, and also the qualities entrepreneurs demonstrate are valuable in a wide spectrum of life’s activities. Letter grade. (Offered every year.) 3 credits
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    ENTR 495 - Special Topics in Entrepreneurship


    Prerequisites, business administration major or entrepreneurship minor and ENTR 310  and some sections of this course may require additional prerequisites or corequisites. In-depth study of an entrepreneurship topic; content of course changes every semester. Letter grade. Repeatable for credit once if the topic is different. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits

Finance

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    FIN 207 - Personal Finance


    Prerequisite, quantitative inquiry course. This course addresses the major personal financial planning issues that individuals and households face. Topics include establishing savings goals, using banking, credit, and other financial services, tax and estate planning, making good investment decisions, and comparing insurance products. Cannot be used to fulfill major requirements. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
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    FIN 307 - The Financial System


    Prerequisites, ECON 200 , ECON 201  and MGSC 209  or MATH 203 . Financial intermediation and institutions, central banking, financial markets, and monetary economics. The impact of fiscal and monetary policy on interest rates. Provides a background for understanding financial structure and capital markets for business majors. Letter grade. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
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    FIN 312 - Financial Reporting and Statement Analysis


    (Same as ACTG 312 .) 3 credits
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    FIN 317 - Financial Management


    Prerequisites, ACTG 210 , ECON 200 , ECON 201  and MGSC 209  or MATH 203  and MATH 109  or MATH 110 . Principles governing the financial management of corporations with emphasis on the role of the financial manager; current asset management; financial structure; analysis of financial statements; evaluation of short-term and long-term funding sources; cost of capital and capital budgeting; evaluation of dividend policy; and financial forecasting. Letter grade. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
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    FIN 327 - Intermediate Financial Management


    Prerequisite, FIN 317 . Financial ratio analysis; breakeven analysis; management of cash, marketable securities, inventory and accounts receivable; portfolio theory; dividend policy; mergers and acquisitions; capital budgeting, and international finance. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
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    FIN 400 - A Walk Down Wall Street


    Prerequisites, FIN 317 , consent of instructor. An examination of the practical operation of financial markets and the functions of the major players within the markets. The class will visit New York City for one week and will seek to tour the New York Stock Exchange, the NASDAQ Marketsite, and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Meetings will be scheduled with a variety of firms selected from investment banks, money managers, and financial information providers. Fee: TBD (Offered interterm.) 3 credits
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    FIN 410 - International Financial Management


    Prerequisite, FIN 317 . Application of principles of international financial management. Topics include foreign exchange markets, risk management, problems unique to international operations, international sources and uses of funds, long-term assets and liability management, capital budgeting and corporate financial strategy in an international context. Letter grade. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
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    FIN 421 - Investments


    Prerequisite, FIN 317 . Investment principles and practices with emphasis on the individual investor. The evaluation, selection, and management of securities; investment principles; trading methods and valuation; different types of investments and savings; portfolio theory; sources of investment information, and interpretation of financial statements. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
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    FIN 431 - Portfolio Management and Analysis


    Prerequisite, FIN 421 , with minimum grade of B, or consent of instructor. The course will focus on the application of financial theory to the issues and problems of security analysis and portfolio management. Topics will include the selection of equity securities and portfolios to meet investment objectives and the measurement of portfolio performance. The course will build upon the analytical skills developed in FIN 421 . Students in this course oversee the student managed investment fund. (Offered every year.) 3 credits
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    FIN 442 - Fixed Income and Derivative Securities


    Prerequisite, FIN 421  with a grade of “B” or higher. This course focuses on pricing, risk management and institutional issues in the fixed income and derivative markets. Topics include bond sectors, yield spreads, swaps, arbitrage-free valuation, forward rate and term structure theories, futures pricing, option payoffs and strategies, option pricing models, option sensitivities and hedging. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits
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    FIN 496 - Special Topics in Finance


    Prerequisite, FIN 317 . In-depth study of a specific area, content of course changes every semester. May be repeated once. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits
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    FIN 499 - Individual Study


    Prerequisite, approval of petition. For students who wish to pursue a special area of study not included in the curriculum. Maximum of 6 credits. (Offered every semester.) 1-3 credits

Management

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    MGMT 316 - Management of Organizations


    Prerequisites, ACTG 210 , ECON 200 , ECON 201 , and MATH 109 , or MATH 110 . Contemporary issues in management designed to improve managerial skills. Focuses on the three primary tasks of managers: managing strategy, managing structure, and managing behavior. Develops skills in strategic planning, organization design, motivation, leadership, decision-making, and implementing change. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
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    MGMT 360 - Human Resources Management


    Prerequisite, MGMT 316 . This course examines the management of human resources in organizational settings. A systems model of human resources management is used as a framework for understanding the competitive advantages of strategically managing an organization’s human resources. The goals of the course are to teach students to successfully design, implement, and evaluate human resource programs including planning, performance management, recruitment, selection, training, development, and compensation. Students examine the influence of internal organizational variables and external environmental variables on the ways that organizations manage their human resources to successfully compete in today’s market. Letter grade. (Offered every year.) 3 credits
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    MGMT 470 - International Business Management


    Prerequisites, ECON 200 , ECON 201 , MKTG 304 , MGMT 316 . A course of study designed to examine the role of business firms in the international business environment. The thrust of the course is to study the environmental relationships, cultural and political impacts, and the effects on the community of nations as the international business community grows and spreads. Specific management problems that are inherent in multinational activities are of prime importance. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
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    MGMT 480 - Human Behavior in Organizations


    Prerequisite, MGMT 316 . The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the use of basic theories of individual, group, and macro-organizational behavior in addressing managerial and enterprise challenges. Case studies and experiential exercises are used to allow students to apply theory to practice. (Offered every year.) 3 credits
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    MGMT 484 - Digital Transformation of the Entertainment Industries


    Prerequisites, ECON 200 , MGMT 316 . The digitization of entertainment goods - goods like books, music, movies, and television - has profoundly impacted the way that such goods are produced, marketed, sold, and promoted. It has weakened the effective strength of copyright and altered the balance of power in existing industries. And the changes are far from over. This course will examine the fundamental economic principles behind how firm and consumer behavior have changed in these industries and attempt to use these principles to predict what changes we can expect to see ongoing, how firms should respond, and where there is opportunity to proactively shape the future of entertainment. (Offered every year.) 3 credits
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    MGMT 496 - Special Topics in Management


    Some sections of this course may require prerequisites or corequisites In-depth study of a specific area; content of course changes every semester. May be repeated once. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits
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    MGMT 499 - Individual Study


    Prerequisite, approval of petition. For students who wish to pursue a special area of study not included in the curriculum. Maximum of 6 credits. (Offered every semester.) 1-3 credits

Management Science

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    MGSC 209 - Introductory Business Statistics


    Prerequisite, MATH 109 , or MATH 110 . Emphasis on the use of statistics as an aid in reaching business decisions. Central tendency and dispersion, probability theory; discrete and normal distributions, sampling theory, sampling distributions, and statistical inference in business-related problems. Testing hypotheses in large and small samples. Correlation and regression analyses. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
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    MGSC 220 - Foundations of Business Analytics


    Prerequisite, MGSC 209  or MATH 203  or PSY 203 . This course focuses on building models and describing data in spreadsheets to solve business problems. Topics in descriptive, predictive and prescriptive analytics are covered including data visualization, multiple regression, simulation and linear optimization. Emphasis is placed on theory, application of theory using appropriate software and on managerial interpretation of results. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
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    MGSC 300 - Management Information Systems


    Prerequisites, ACTG 210 , ECON 200 , ECON 201  and MATH 109 , or MATH 110 . Builds a basic understanding of the value and uses of information systems for business operations, management decision making, and strategic advantage. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
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    MGSC 310 - Statistical Models in Business Analytics


    Prerequisite, MGSC 220 . A rigorous introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics in analytics with applications in accounting, finance, marketing and operations. The course focuses on data mining: logistic regression, nearest neighbor, decision trees, naïve Bayes and others, following a review of basic introductory statistical methods. The course introduces theories and concepts in estimation including choice of technique, model choice and false discovery. Students are required to implement and interpret modeling scripts in using R statistical software. Letter grade. (Offered every year.) 3 credits
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    MGSC 346 - Production and Operations Management


    Prerequisite, MATH 203 , or MGSC 209 . Study of the production/operations management function. Topics include operations strategy, forecasting, inventory control, scheduling, queuing theory, project management, facilities layout, and quality assurance. The focus of this class will be on problem solving. Computer software will be used extensively. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
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    MGSC 406 - Advanced Experimental Design and Statistics


    Prerequisites, MATH 203  or MGSC 209  or equivalent and behavioral and computational economics major. Advanced statistics as employed in the construction and optimization of experimental designs and subsequent analysis of data. Between-designs and one- and two-way ANOVA in detail from a linear modeling and least squares perspective (to match basic econometrics); power planning; general tests of contrasts; within-designs and repeated measures designs. Letter grade. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits
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    MGSC 410 - Applied Business Analytics


    Prerequisites, MGSC 310 , CPSC 392 . This course provides a hands-on opportunity for students to integrate and apply the analytics skills and knowledge learned throughout the course to real world data. The course will reinforce the methods and techniques typically used in analytics including data preparation, building and evaluating wide variety of models and interpreting and presenting the results. Students work in teams on a large scale analytics project. At the end of the course, students submit a report summarizing their analyses and study outcomes, and present their results to the class. (Offered every year.) 3 credits
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    MGSC 496 - Special Topics in Management Science


    In-depth study of a specific area, content of course changes every semester. May be repeated once. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits
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    MGSC 499 - Individual Study


    Prerequisite, approval of petition. For students who wish to pursue a special area of study not included in the curriculum. Maximum of 6 credits. (Offered every semester.) 1-3 credits

Marketing

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    MKTG 304 - Marketing


    Prerequisites, ECON 200 , ECON 201 , ACTG 210  and MGSC 209 , or MATH 203  and MATH 109 , or MATH 110 . The marketing of goods and services and the role of marketing in the economy. Topics include: the marketing environment and the marketing management function; market analysis including buyer behavior and market segmentation; marketing mix policies including product, channel, promotion, and pricing; and public policies toward marketing. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits
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